Stow Presbyterian Church

...Know, Grow, Go, Show, Sow

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Church Library

Celebrate!

“Follow me and you will see, the library is fun for you and me!”   -Dr. Seuss

Beginning January 1st and continuing through February 29th the Church Library is having a circulation promotional for all library materials. Our goal is to have 225 or more items circulated during January and February. With this promotional there are no forms to fill out and it is not just restricted to reading, all materials you use are counted. We will celebrate our success on March 6th with a cake reception provided by the Church Library.

To get you started here are some of our newest materials with a copyright of 2015:

Main Library:

The friends of Jesus [232.95/Kin] by Karen Kingsbury. Often we struggle the most with our friends, those people who spend time with us and know us best. This Bible story will give you a deeper understanding of the friends of Jesus as you learn what the Bible has to say about these fascinating relationships.

God is always hiring : 50 lessons for finding fulfilling work [248.88/Bre] by Regina Brett. These stories will appeal to all those seeking inspiration, especially those     graduating college in a tough job market, as well as those seeking more fulfilling work or feeling stuck in their lives.

Hope : the rebirth of Israel [DVD/956.94/Rob] by Gordon   Robertson. This is the story of the half-century before Israel's rebirth, told through the eyes of the       nation's founders: Theodor Herzl, Chaim Weizmann, David Ben-Gurion, and Golda Meir.

Come rain or come shine [F/Kar/Mit/11] by Jan Karon. Over the course of ten Mitford novels, fans have kept a special place in their hearts for Dooley Kavanagh, first seen in At Home in Mitford as a barefoot, freckle-faced boy in filthy overalls. Now, Father Tim Kavanagh’s adopted son has graduated from vet school, opened his own animal clinic, and plans to marry Lace Harper, his once and future soul mate.

The third target [F/Ros] by Joel C. Rosenberg. When New York Times foreign correspondent J.B. Collins hears rumors that an al-Qaeda splinter cell--ISIS--has captured a cache of chemical weapons inside Syria, Collins knows this is a story he must pursue at all costs. Does the commander of the jihadist   faction really have the weapons? If so, who is the intended target? With tensions already high, the impending visit of the American president to the region could prove to be the spark that sets off an explosion of horrendous proportions.

Children’s Library:

The proud chicken [C226.8/Joe] by Mike Joens. Chadwick is a very proud rooster who loves to sing and wants everyone to listen and look at him. But all the other animals in Theo's barn are sick and tired of his bad attitude. Will Chadwick learn the important lesson of being too proud?

Noah's ark : a lesson in trusting God [DVD/C222.11/Veg] VeggieTales. Noah and his family, along with a zoo full of animals, take an adventure aboard an orange slice ark! After 40 days and nights of rain, everyone's faith has been tested, and they're ready to jump ship! will they chart a new course, or will they remember to trust God's promises? Grab your umbrellas and find out in this VeggieTales re-telling of the beloved Bible story!

Prayer works : prayer training and strategy for kids [J248.32/Ken] by Stephen Kendrick. This companion book to the movie War Room is an engaging way to get children ages 8 to 12 to grow in their prayer life. As kids grow, their prayer life needs to grow too. Lots of great explanations are combined with fun activities, illustrations, and journaling prompts to get kids thinking and praying.

Teen Library:

Beyond championships : a playbook for winning at life : teen edition [T170.44/Joy] by Dru Joyce, II. As Dru outlines the nine principles that he promotes to his players and tries to live in his own life as well, you'll discover that the solid foundation on which he built so many successful basketball programs can be applied to almost any situation. As you assess your chosen path in life and look for ways to embark on a more inspiring and rewarding journey, Coach Dru offers an     accessible and relatable roadmap.

You have a brain : a teen's guide to think big [T248.83/Car] by Ben Carson. Growing up, renowned neurosurgeon Ben Carson faced many challenges: abandonment by his father, trouble at school, the turbulence of inner-city Detroit, and violent temper. But instead of letting his circumstances control him, Dr. Carson discovered eight principles that turned his future upside down. Dr. Carson gives students an inspirational look at the transformative philosophy that helped him meet life's obstacles and leap over them, motivating teens to think big, dream big, and break free of any fear that holds them back.

Bonhoeffer : pastor, martyr, prophet, spy [TB/Bon] by Eric Metaxas. This student edition tells Bonhoeffer's story in a compelling and relatable way. Young readers will enjoy learning about the fascinating life of the man who had the courage to follow his convictions into Nazi Germany, where he stood up for others because of his faith.

Come on in and check it out

Chrismons by Joyce Kight

Chrismons are being used on the tree in the Main Sanctuary. The ones on display in the Church Library display cases were made and donated to the Church by  former member, Joy Spencer. I do not know if Joy is related to Frances Spencer who originated the concept and brought it to fruition in her church in 1957, then gave the copyright on the word “Chrismons” to Ascension Lutheran Church, Danville, VA. Here is some history to help us more fully understand about Chrismons.

Frances Kipps Spencer

1917-1990

In 1957, Frances Kipps Spencer began thinking of a way to decorate the Christmas tree in her church that would be more suitable for a sanctuary. She thought that the usual brightly colored Christmas ornaments were just not appropriate for a setting of worship, so she began researching and looking for something that would reflect the Christian faith.

Mrs. Spencer began by trying to imagine herself in the shoes of Mary, the mother of Jesus. She asked, "How would Mary celebrate Jesus' birthday?" The answer from our culture and time period would have a cake and candles and his name on it. Mrs. Spencer then looked upon the traditional Christmas tree as a cake and placed on the tree the name Jesus and his title Christ. Instead of using the name and title in English, however, she used Greek monograms. Thus the letters in Greek, "Chi Rho," became one of the earliest Chrismons because they are monograms for Christos, the Greek word for Christ. The word Chrismons itself is a   combination of the words Christ and Monogram.

Simple monograms of Jesus Christ, as well as a few crosses, decorated the first Chrismons tree. As the beauty and meaning of Chrismons attracted people, Frances Spencer added other designs, which were copies in present day material, of signs and symbols used by the earliest Christians. These later ornaments grew more sophisticated in meaning and complex in execution. She   began to create original designs that depicted Biblical teachings and events. For example, in 1960, a large figure 8 that delineated the Christian year, which follows the life of Christ, was added to the tree. In another case, at her husband's suggestion, Mrs. Spencer created a series of Chrismons based on the Beatitudes and added to the tree in 1968.

According to the dictionary, a Chrismon is a monogram of Christ. But the Chrismons as ornaments are more than monograms; they may also tell about Jesus Christ. As the designs grew in number, they included references to the life, ministry, activities, nature and teaching of Jesus. Thus the Chrismons as symbols always point beyond themselves to God. Indeed, the vital feature of the concept is that each design must proclaim some truth about God as seen in Jesus.

MAY THESE SYMBOLS CONTINUALLY REMIND YOU OF GOD'S GREATEST GIFT TO US ALL, JESUS CHRIST.

Come on in and check it out.

God Is Our Help

The Church Library has a variety of materials on all aspects of our Christian life. Here are just a few items from the Main Library to spark your interest:

Things that go bump in the night: how to help your children overcome their fears [155.4/War] by Paul Warren. This unique approach to parenting discusses the natural fears all children face and tells how parents can help their children work through fears that are common to each stage of growth.

When someone you know is hurting: what you can do to help [158/Ric] by M. Gregory Richards. A guide to empathy explains how to become a better listener, how to understand the cycles of grief, and how to lend compassion, warmth, and insight to someone suffering from life’s crises.

Seven reasons why you can trust the Bible [220.1/Lut] by Erwin W. Lutzer. Offering solid arguments for the trustworthiness of the Bible, Lutzer shows you why the stories, claims, and predictions of Scripture are true. His insights will help you grow in faith, and to confidently respond to doubters.

Fearless : imagine your life without fear [248.86/Luc] by Max Lucado. Offers Biblical teachings on overcoming fear and living with dependence on the promise of Christ for faith and courage.

You'll get through this : hope and help for your turbulent times [248.86/Luc] by Max Lucado. Lucado encourages readers through sharing the Biblical story of Joseph. Stripped of his identity, thrown into a pit and sold as a slave, his was a story of defeat and challenges, but as time passed God worked through his circumstances to bring redemption and reconciliation. And although it may seem hard to believe, you will get through this too.


"God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.” Psalms 46:1 [ESV]

Kenneth Kight would like to share the following two examples of just how real God is in protecting us even when we aren’t aware of it. If you have any further questions about either incident, just ask Ken, and he will gladly share.

“On July 30, 1940, my dad was washing dishes while my mother was laying down and I was playing. Suddenly we heard a loud explosion. Dad picked me up and told mother we were going to see what happened. We ran through the woods by our house and down Bailey Road to an open field. There we could see that a train and “Doodlebug” had collided. A stream of water was being sprayed on the engine, then more streams were added. Around the back of the buildings at the “Junction” on Hudson Drive, we could get up close to the “Doodlebug”. My dad was trying to show me the people in windows of the car. All I could see was a smoked window. I believe God was preventing me, as a child, from seeing such a horrific scene. Many people started to gather as the first ambulance arrived. We moved out of the way so the ambulances could back in. My grandparents’ house was just up Hudson Drive. We went there and sat on the front porch swing while listening to the neighbors as they walked by. Sirens wailed into the night as other ambulances arrived from other cities. This was the worst rail disaster in Cuyahoga Falls history with 43 killed while only three survived. The accident happened at Hudson Drive and Front Street and there is now a memorial monument on Front Street at Bailey Road.”

“On August 28, 2014, I was   cleaning our upholstered family room furniture and laying the cushions across our side yard clothes line to dry. I had been in and out several times over the course of the early afternoon. Just before 3:30 pm sirens from all   directions descended on our   neighborhood. When I stepped outside to see what was happening an officer asked that I step back inside. This was the beginning of the investigation of the first homicide in Cuyahoga Falls since 2010. Because this was our neighbor with whom I had talked and seen, my testimony had been requested at the recent trial. Again I believe God protected me from seeing another horrific scene.”

Giving God the Glory!

Kenneth Kight

 

The Power of One...Good Book

We all have a favorite book, one that has impacted our lives and made us a better person. As believers that one book is our Bible. Why are there so many Bible  translations? Rose Publishing, Incorporated answers this question.

For more than 2000 years, scholars have been translating the Bible. The Old Testament was written over a 1500-year period before the birth of Christ. It was written primarily in Hebrew, with a few portions in   Aramaic. The New Testament was written within 70 years of Christ’s death and resurrection (AD 50-100). The writers of the New Testament wrote in Koine Greek (“common”Greek).

The original manuscripts have not survived, but God’s Word has been preserved through meticulous  copying. Three primary methods of translation (and a fourth translation treatment) have evolved over the centuries:

Word-for-Word – A process in which biblical and linguistic scholars attempt to translate each word based upon the word usage at the time of the writing. 

Balance – A process in which scholars attempt to mediate between a word-for-word approach and a thought-for-thought approach.

Thought-for-Thought – A process in which scholars translate the meaning of each thought. This is how most non-biblical translation for modern books is done.

Paraphrase – A re-statement of a translation in modern terms and vocabulary, often expanded (or “amplified”) for clarity.

Why do new translations continue to appear?

Words change. 

Our understanding of ancient languages changes.

Translators’ purposes vary.

Bibles in the Church Library use Dewey number 220.5 or 225.5 for New Testaments. We have a large variety of translations, marked on the spine label, for your use including: 

AMP [Amplified]

CEB [Common English Bible]

CEV [Contemporary English Version]

ESV [English Standard Version]

GW [God’s Word Translation] 

ICB [International Children’s Bible]

KJV [King James Version] 

NCV [New Century Version]

NIV [New International Version] 

NIrV [New International Reader’s Version]

NJB [New Jerusalem Bible] 

NKJ [New King James Version]

NLT [New Living Translation]

RSV [Revised Standard Version]

TLB [The Living Bible]

TEV [Today’s English Version, Good News Translation]

Within these translations we also have a variety of study Bibles that contain helpful information provided by a variety of authors.

Come on in and check it out!

 

Keeping Current

It was recently suggested that an article about the great magazines available in the Church Library be presented. We subscribe to some magazines on an annual basis, while others are offered free of charge. Although the check-out cards would indicate a low circulation, I have observed magazines being read in the library during times of waiting or relaxing. All magazines are carded and may be check-out the same as all other materials. We ask that they be   returned in one week. Here are the titles with a brief description that we currently have for your use:

 

Main Library:

 

Biblical Archaeology Review. BAR is the only magazine that connects the academic study of archaeology to a broad general  audience eager to     understand the world of the Bible. Covering both the Old and New Testaments, BAR presents the latest discoveries and controversies in archaeology with breathtaking photography and informative maps and diagrams.

 

Church Health Reader. The mission of Church Health is to reclaim the Church’s biblical commitment to care for our bodies and spirits. In support of that    mission, Church Health Reader  publishes inspirational and innovative resources drawn from knowledgeable sources, and offers practical ways to create happier, healthier communities.

 

Northeast Ohio Parent. Northeast Ohio Parent launched in March 2014 as a refreshing new monthly publication for  parents in the Greater Cleveland/Akron region. Content focus areas include education, enrichment, health and wellness, activities and events,  recreation, entertainment, community profiles and much more.’ll see the best that Northeast Ohio has to offer as viewed through a family-friendly lens.

 

Outreach. This magazine is the gathering place of ideas, insights and stories for Christian churches focused on reaching out to their community – locally and globally – with the love of Christ. Our primary readers are pastors and church leaders, as well as laity who are passionate about outreach.

 

Tabletalk. Each issue contains challenging, stimulating articles on a wide variety of issues related to theology and Christian living, written by eminently trustworthy authors – names like Sinclair Ferguson, John MacArthur and R.C. Sproul. A Bible study for each dayTabletalk helps you understand the Bible and apply it to daily living.

 

Children’s Library:

 

Clubhouse, Jr. Faith-filled fun for youngsters ages 3-7. Creative stories, fascinating articles, puzzles, craft ideas and more are packed into each issue. You'll love the way this bright and colorful kids magazine reinforces biblical values and helps boys and girls explore their world. Published by Focus on the Family we have 8 years of magazines bound together by month.

 

Clubhouse. Published by Focus on the Family, we have 8 years of magazines bound together by month. This kids magazine for ages 8-12 reinforces    traditional values and promotes family closeness with hands-on activities, challenging puzzles and exciting stories.

 

WORLDkids : let’s go exploring. Finding effective tools that foster a love for learning among 7-10 year olds can be a tall order. Finding tools that are safe and reinforce your beliefs may seem nearly impossible. Your child will have fun learning, while the truth is reinforced in ways that encourage the pursuit of the kind of life God intends.

 

Teen Library:

 

WORLDteen.In our clouded cultural narrative, savvy voices  consistently sow misleading seeds with our teens – powerfully suggesting how they should think and live. Our goal is simple: to   engage them with the truth in a way that helps them pursue the kind of life God intends. Your teen will have fun learning, while the truth is reinforced in ways that encourage the pursuit of the kind of life God intends.

 

Come on in and check it out.

 

 

 

Good Mission Reads

As we continue our annual summer promotional, “Ice Cream for Books!” I would like you to be aware of Elisabeth Elliot and her testimony. 

Born Elisabeth Howard in Belgium to missionary parents on Dec. 21, 1926, she came to the United States with her siblings and parents the following year. After spending the majority of her childhood in Germantown, Pennsylvania and Moorestown, New Jersey, she attended Wheaton College she majored in Greek to facilitate her desire to use linguistics on the mission field and serve as a Bible translator. She graduated in 1948. Elisabeth Elliot, a woman whose life story transfixed and inspired women through six decades and at least three generations, has died. Author, speaker, and missionary pioneer Elisabeth Elliot Gren died this morning, June 15, at the age of 88 following a lengthy battle with dementia.

She wrote “It is my prayer that the Spirit of God will direct you as you read…” in the foreword of Lies women believe [248.843/DeM] by Nancy Leigh DeMoss. That is also my prayer as you use our Church Library. Here is a list of some of the materials by or about Elisabeth  Elliot in our Church Library:

Main Library:

Loneliness : it can be a wilderness, it can be a pathway to God [248.86/Ell] by Elisabeth Elliot.  Elliot gives hope to the lonely through tender reflections on God's love for us and his plans to bless us. Here you will find honesty and compassion, not platitudes. She tackles this difficult topic with grace and faith, showing you how to make peace with loneliness, however it has come about, and how to grow through it.

End of the spear : a true story [986.6/Sai] by Steve Saint.  This is the true story of how Steve Saint is asked by the Woadani to return to the jungle with his family to live among them and teach them to interact with the encroaching outside world.

Path through suffering : God's mercy in your pain [AC/248.86/Ell] by Elisabeth Elliot. When dealing with tragedies like death, divorce or illness, discover God's hope and peace in your life.

End of the spear : from a true story [DVD/986.6/Gav] by Bart Gavigan. When five young missionaries, among them Jim Elliot and Nate Saint, are speared to death by the Waodani in 1956, a series of      miraculous events unfolds that changes the lives of the slain men's families and the Ecuadorian tribe they were attempting to befriend. Based on a true story of love and forgiveness.

Children’s Library:

Jim Elliot : a light for God [CB/Ell] by Renee Taft Meloche. Jim bravely faced both the wonders and the dangers of the South American  jungle to share God's love with the feared and isolated Auca people. His death ignited a flame for missions that spread to Christians everywhere.

Jim Elliot : one great purpose [JB/Ell] by Janet Benge. Tells how Jim Elliot and his coworkers             surrendered their lives in Ecuador's jungle, challenging countless Christians to live with a great purpose of bringing the Gospel to those who have never heard.

Jim Elliot : missionary to Ecuador [JB/Ell] by Susan Martins Miller. This story of Jim Elliot's brief adult life is an account of how he heard and responded to God's voice.

Teen Library:

Dayuma : life under Waorani spears [TB/Day] by Ethel Emily Wallis. Jim Elliot, Nate Saint, Pete Fleming, Roger Youderian, and Ed McCully chose to lay down their lives on a sandy beach in Ecuador. Their lives and sacrifice come full circle in the breathtaking true story of Dayuma. Hers is the unforgettable story of one girl's odyssey into the unknown. Her eventual encounter with Christ ultimately changed her life and forever altered the destiny of her people. Dayuma is a vivid, lasting testimony to the power of the love of God and the cross to reach beyond any barrier.

Come on in and check it out.

 

Using the Library

Boy-in-library

Our expanded church library is open when the church is open and anyone can check out materials. Here's how: 

Select materials you wish to borrow. Remove the circulation card and write in your name (and phone number if not a church member).Then place card in the check out box.

Books may be checked out up to 3 weeks; all other materials 1 week. When returning materials, place them in the top drawer of the lateral file cabinet marked "Returned materials."

Enjoy!


Logos Builder Plan

Logos Builder plan

Tips for Selecting Children's Books

Library-Mom-Daughter

Parents, here are some tips for helping your child select books appropriate to his/her reading level:

Have your child read the first page or two of the book. Ask  them to hold up 1 finger for every word they don't know. If they hold up 5 fingers while reading, consider this a "read it to me" book, rather than a book to read on their own. If they hold up only 2-3 fingers, you've found a "just right" book.


Meet Joyce Kight

Joyce_web_2

Joyce Kight, our director of Christian resources, manages one of the largest Christian lending libraries in the area. She has spent over 30 years in library ministry (nearly 20 of them with us!), sharing her love of God and books and supporting congregational libraries. Read Joyce's story.


Book Club Selections

CBM no date

Christian Books and More
Thursday Evening Book Duscussion Group

 Thurs., Jan. 28,
@7 :00 pa.m.

 This book group is open to all adults who love to read. 

 

 

 


Copyright (c) 2016 Stow Presbyterian Church : Privacy Statement : Terms Of Use